A broken arm in Italy: waiting for a surgery



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Broken arm of IlanBenjamin Davies

Ilan, my 9 year old son, had fingerprints of pain on his face when I reached him. Holding an angled origami forearm, the vacation mode was in a controlled panic. A broken arm in the Italian countryside: a work of fiction & nbsp;news-Sorrento under the broken arm.

It has become clear that doctors who share too much will immediately share a blog about their family medical interactions with the health system; even more so it is from a foreign country. I wade in.

Sarah Davies looking at the Amalfi CoastBenjamin Davies

Sorrento, Italy, is a picturesque town located on the Amalfi Coast. In summer, it is invaded by modern Italians and wealthy tourists. It has the feel of East Hampton without the backers funders. The infrastructure is undeniably Italian. Police, lazily police. Families on scooters pinball around trucks. The hospital of Sorrento is not the Hospital of Special Surgery of Manhattan.

I drove. The child happily holds his origami arm. In the space where an American emergency room would dream, Ilan was X-rayed. Reduced. Casted. The orthopedic resident who was carrying cigarettes was efficient and kind. He suggested that we go to the Children's Hospital in Naples (at one and a half hours) to see if surgery was needed. It was 10 pm on Friday night. The news had become a tragic opera.

We leave. This time with a rental car: just the child and me. I took a liter of coke for the ride. Ilan and I exchanged it like cowboys fighting for a bottle of whiskey. We put the windows down and let the warm air keep us from sleeping. The taxi driver ransacked Drake. Good time.

Again, a quick trip in & nbsp; the Italian emergency room. A pediatric orthopedic surgeon present met us within five minutes. Looking at the movies, he stated that he probably needed a surgical procedure. Or maybe not. Call in a few days. Ciao.

The total amount for & nbsp; two visits to the emergency room, medical care and three specialists was $ 0. They made fun of me when I wanted to take out my insurance cards.

According to World Health Organization (WHO) The Italian health system is ranked number two in the world (just behind France). The ranking is based on four pillars: responsiveness, fair financial contribution, general health level of the population and distribution of health (a poor system would have rich health, but poor poor). Italy has a strong health care system, which certainly benefits the population. The life expectancy is 82 years old.

Of course, there is another truth in front of me that eats his third ice of the day. We were told to wait for emergency care. In fact, many surgeries and urgent procedures are perfectly acceptable on a medical level. Emotionally, not so much. The expectation of a (semi) emergent surgery is atypical in America. Of course, this happens, but I have never heard of a child waiting for a surgery on his arm. He would have been placed on the list of the operating room and would have been corrected as soon as possible.

There are many more serious surgeries, such as cancer cases or even cardiac care, that are suspended for months in these types of health care systems.

The concept of "health insurance for all" has become the center of the rising democratic platform, now left. & nbsp; Maybe it's too early to call it the Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez& nbsp; but if recent polls are correct, the majority of Americans & nbsp; now support a single payer system. Such a system will undoubtedly have compromises to make to which Americans are not accustomed. I know I'm not. I was severely depressed and annoyed by the fact that my child could not get surgery quickly. I will freely concede that it is a small price to pay for a system that provides better care for the population and does not systematically fail people just because they get sick.

Socialism was not in my mind when I explained to Ilan our difficult situation. Instead, we searched for the next return flight.

Safe at homeBenjamin Davies

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Broken arm of IlanBenjamin Davies

Ilan, my 9 year old son, had fingerprints of pain on his face when I reached him. Holding an angled origami forearm, the vacation mode was in a controlled panic. A broken arm in the Italian countryside: a non-fiction news-Sorrento under the broken arm.

It has become clear that doctors who share too much will immediately share a blog about their family medical interactions with the health system; even more so it is from a foreign country. I wade in.

Sarah Davies looking at the Amalfi CoastBenjamin Davies

Sorrento, Italy, is a picturesque town located on the Amalfi Coast. In summer, it is invaded by modern Italians and wealthy tourists. It has the feel of East Hampton without the backers funders. The infrastructure is undeniably Italian. Police, lazily police. Families on scooters pinball around trucks. The hospital of Sorrento is not the Hospital of Special Surgery of Manhattan.

I drove. The child happily holds his origami arm. In the space where an American emergency room would dream, Ilan was X-rayed. Reduced. Casted. The orthopedic resident who was carrying cigarettes was efficient and kind. He suggested that we go to the Children's Hospital in Naples (at one and a half hours) to see if surgery was needed. It was 10 pm on Friday night. The news had become a tragic opera.

We leave. This time with a rental car: just the child and me. I took a liter of coke for the ride. Ilan and I exchanged it like cowboys fighting for a bottle of whiskey. We put the windows down and let the warm air keep us from sleeping. The taxi driver ransacked Drake. Good time.

Again a quick trip in and out of the Italian emergency room. A pediatric orthopedic surgeon present met us within five minutes. Looking at the movies, he stated that he probably needed a surgical procedure. Or maybe not. Call in a few days. Ciao.

The total amount for two visits to the emergency room, medical care and three specialists was $ 0. They made fun of me when I wanted to take out my insurance cards.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Italian health care system is the second largest country in the world (second behind France). The ranking is based on four pillars: responsiveness, fair financial contribution, general level of population health, and distribution of health (a poor system would have rich, healthy people but poor, poor people). Italy has a strong health care system, which certainly benefits the population. The life expectancy is 82 years old.

Of course, there is another truth in front of me that eats his third ice of the day. We were told to wait for emergency care. In fact, many surgeries and urgent procedures are perfectly acceptable, medically. Emotionally, not so much. The expectation of a (semi) emergent surgery is atypical in America. Of course, this happens, but I have never heard of a child waiting for a surgery on his arm. He would have been placed on the list of the operating room and would have been corrected as soon as possible.

There are many more serious surgeries, such as cancer cases or even cardiac care, that are suspended for months in these types of health care systems.

The concept of "Medicare for all" has become the center of the growing democratic platform, which is now looking to the left. It may be too early to call this party the Ocasio-Cortez party of Alexandria but, if the recent polls are correct, a majority of Americans are now in favor of a single payer system. Such a system will undoubtedly lead to compromises that Americans are not used to. I know I'm not. I was severely depressed and annoyed by the fact that my child could not get surgery quickly. I will freely concede that it is a small price to pay for a system that provides better care for the population and does not systematically fail people just because they get sick.

Socialism was not in my mind when I explained to Ilan our difficult situation. Instead, we searched for the next return flight.

Safe at homeBenjamin Davies