It's about the skill set, not the suit or the degree



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High school failed me. & nbsp; As a high school dropout, I knew I was taking a risk by refusing the "normal way" and still wanted to be part of the business world. & nbsp; During a task in my computer class, I did not show up in a suit and tie for the presentation. & nbsp; The instructor tied me up so that I did not "dress well", which puzzled me. After all, this course was about desktop publishing. Why would this pose a problem? & nbsp; It should be the substance of my work and not a preconceived and superficial idea about my appearance. & nbsp; For me, it has always been about the substance and not the combination.

The good news is that federal support for colleges has reached its peak. & nbsp; The bad news is that millions of young adults feel that they have no choice but to enroll in a four-year university, resulting in huge debt for many students .

Patrick Bryant and his son, PatePatrick Bryant

I recently had lunch with Patrick Bryant and his son, Pate. Patrick is a serial entrepreneur, while Pate is an emerging high school and high school student with enough university-level credits to graduate one semester earlier. It is also a perfect example of a student who learned the code through a third school, JRS Coding School. The school of twelve to nine out of five weeks is well placed for adults learning the code to enter their workplace and Pate attended the code course during the summer of his first year, becoming very competent in JavaScript.

"We were mixed about Pate's need to go to college, he knows he wants to code and he's determined to become a technology entrepreneur," Patrick said. "Of course, the college offers other experiences and a social network that play an important role in its development, but we are proud of its choice not to go to college and enter the job market directly. already an accomplished member of the development team at work and, within four years, when his peers join the workforce, he should already be much more advanced in terms of seniority, experience and income. "

"I already have the knowledge and ability to write code to pay someone who has written for four years at the university," said Pate. "I love Solving problems, that's why I like coding. Going to college would be a waste of time for a computer degree.Many of my colleagues are self-taught. & nbsp; That would make sense for others degrees like law or medical. "

Clayton Christensen, professor at Harvard Business Last year, he made a surprising prediction stating that "nearly half of American universities would close or go bankrupt 10 to 15 years from now". & nbsp; Between online education and the emerging technology and coding sector, he sees technology undermining the four college model over a year. & nbsp; I, for one, welcome the tidal wave we need so much in the way we develop and nurture the next generation of manpower.

Fortunately, young adults have understood the failure of the status quo. & nbsp; In 2017, the think tank New America published a survey revealing that only 13% of Millennial women either agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that "higher education nowadays well, while 79% said they either disagreed or disagreed with this feeling. " If nearly 80% of young people Adults who enter the classrooms consider that the system is failing. Why are we continuing in this direction?

I've already talked about the benefits of finding talent in unconventional venues and the lack of soft skills of this younger generation. From cooking to valet service, talent is all around us and the static CV is dead. & nbsp; All that is needed is that employers move up a gear in terms of recruitment and open to the idea, as unusual as it may seem, that a degree does not necessarily mean that it is appropriate to apply for a position. & nbsp; Nowhere is this more widespread than in the world of coding.

Coders have been aberrant in this trend to reject the traditional university degree, and there is data to confirm this. & nbsp; A major 2015 developer survey conducted by Stackoverflow revealed that almost half of the 26,000 developers who responded had no degree in computer science. & nbsp; What also caught my attention is that only 25% of the developers in the world have more than 10 years of programming experience. & nbsp; It is a young field that, combined with the high rate of non-formal schooling, creates an environment conducive to risk-taking and counter-current thinking – skills required for programming.

So, my advice to high schools is very simple. & nbsp; Encourage your talented coders to make a career now and not just when they graduate from university. & nbsp; If these young adults develop the appropriate coding skills, companies will open their doors to question them right out of the classroom. & nbsp; Coding is a zero sum game. & nbsp; If they have the appropriate skills, they will succeed. From large technology companies to many young startup companies, job offers are filled with hard-to-fill positions.

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High school failed me. As a high school dropout, I knew I was taking a risk by refusing the "normal way" and still wanted to be part of the business world. During a task in my computer course, I did not show up in a suit and tie for the presentation. The instructor tied me up so that I did not "dress well", which puzzled me. After all, this course was about desktop publishing. Why would this pose a problem? It should work from the substance of my work and not from a preconceived, superficial idea about my appearance. For me, it has always been about the substance and not the combination.

The good news is that federal support for colleges has reached its peak. The bad news is that millions of young adults have the feeling that they have no choice but to enroll in a four-year university, resulting in a disproportionate debt for many students.

Patrick Bryant and his son, PatePatrick Bryant

I recently had lunch with Patrick Bryant and his son, Pate. Patrick is a serial entrepreneur, while Pate is an emerging high school and high school student with enough university-level credits to graduate one semester earlier. It is also a perfect example of a student who has learned the code at a third school, JRS Coding School. The school of twelve to nine out of five weeks is well placed for adults learning the code to enter their workplace and Pate attended the code course during the summer of his first year, becoming very competent in JavaScript.

"We were mixed on the need to go to Pate University, he knows he wants to code and that he focuses on the technology entrepreneur's job," he said. said Patrick. "Of course, the university offers other experiences and a social network that are important for its development, but we are proud of its choice not to go to the university and to enter directly into the job market. He is already an accomplished member of the development team at work and, in four years, when his peers will enter the job market, he should already be much further seniority, experience and income ".

"I already have the knowledge and the ability to write code to pay someone who has written for four years at the university," Pate said. "I like solving problems, that's why I like coding." Going to college would be a waste of time for a computer science degree.Many of my colleagues I work with are self-taught. logical for other degrees like law or medical. "

Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen made a surprising prediction last year stating that "nearly half of America's universities will close or go bankrupt in the next 10 to 15 years." the traditional four-year college model. I, for one, welcome the tidal wave we need so much in the way we develop and nurture the next generation of manpower.

Fortunately, young adults have understood the failure of the status quo. In 2017, think tank New America released a survey revealing that only 13% of millennials either agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that "higher education today, while 79% say they disagree or strongly disagree with this sentiment. If nearly 80% of young adults entering university classes consider that the system is failing, why are we continuing in this direction?

I've already talked about the benefits of finding talent in unconventional venues and the lack of soft skills of this younger generation. From cooking to valet service, talent is all around us and the static CV is dead. All that is needed is that employers get rid of the hamster wheel when it comes to recruitment and open up to the idea, as unconventional as it may seem, that a diploma does not mean necessarily that it is appropriate to apply for a position. Nowhere is this more widespread than in the world of coding.

Coders have been aberrant in this trend to reject the traditional university degree, and there is data to confirm this. A major developer survey conducted in 2015 by Stackoverflow found that nearly half of the 26,000 developers who responded to the survey did not have a degree in computer science. What also caught my attention, is that only 25% of the developers in the world have more than 10 years of experience in programming. It is a young field that, combined with the high rate of non-formal schooling, creates an environment conducive to risk-taking and counter-current thinking – skills required for programming.

So, my advice to high schools is very simple. Encourage your talented coders to make a career now and not just when they graduate from university. If these young adults develop the appropriate coding skills, companies will open their doors to question them right out of the classroom. Coding is a zero sum game. If they have the appropriate skills, they will succeed. From large technology companies to many young startup companies, job offers are filled with hard-to-fill positions.