British start-up Pointr asked by the US Department of Homeland Security to pilot Bluetooth tracking in US airports



<div _ngcontent-c14 = "" innerhtml = "

picture without caption

Pointr's Bluetooth navigation technology is about to be tested in a US airport.R point.

A UK inland start-up company has signed a $ 104,140 contract to test Bluetooth localization in US airports, which could one day transform airport security.

Founded in London, Pointr installs tiny Bluetooth tags around a place that can be used by smartphones for navigation in places where GPS is unreliable.

In London, Pointr has already been installed at King's Cross StationHarrods and Gatwick Airport, where an application can be downloaded and tells you how to get to the platform, portal or product you are looking for.

In Gatwick, Pointr's ultimate goal is to build orientation in augmented reality, which, seen through a smartphone, would place arrows on the ground to guide you.

In collaboration with Homeland Security and in partnership with engineering firm Arup, this is the first time that Pointr technology has been deployed in the United States.

"We are working on this program to help you when you arrive at a US airport, to help travelers get around better, to queue them more efficiently, to reduce wait times and things like that." , Axel Katalan, co-founder and chief marketing officer of the company, said Forbes.

picture without caption

Axel Katalan, co-founder and marketing director of Pointr.R point.

Agony at the airport

With more than 120 million passengers arriving each year in the United States via hundreds of size airports and dozens of different identification documents and visas, placing the right people in the right lanes of the airport is a must. waiting is a big challenge.

Homeland Security initially launch the call last year for "innovative solutions that will ultimately lead to airport-specific real-time guidance systems that can provide travelers with the processes and services they need to reach their destination as quickly as possible".

Katalan said that if the pilot project at an unnamed US airport was successful, R point will approach the project with "the idea of ​​doing it or for every US airport"

Arriving at an American airport is not just an experience that could be improved by this technology; there could be security benefits, too.

The security angle

Although the customer data collected by Pointr is anonymized (Homeland Security has stated that they should remain so for the test), there are still security benefits for Bluetooth tracking at airports, beyond the resolution of the chaos of queues.

picture without caption

Pointr said its more advanced wifi tracking tag would not be used for the homeland security trial.R point.

"You can understand the behavior of the customers, the downtimes or determine how people generally move and if this person moves suspiciously," said Katalan, recalling that this pilot project remained "focused on 39, improving the customer experience "rather than Security.

In addition to simple Bluetooth broadcast beacons for navigation, Pointr has also developed its own Pointr of Presence (POP) tag, which is networked and adds to Wi-Fi tracking, technologies that enable real-time device tracking. located near a location. .

Pointr said Forbes POP will not be used for this test Homeland Security Airport.

Katalan added that privacy is at the heart of Pointr's activities, stating: "All data is stored anonymously and will not be shared with any public party, and users will still have full control over choosing to register. and to withdraw via the application ".

">

picture without caption

Pointr's Bluetooth navigation technology is about to be tested in a US airport.R point.

A UK inland start-up company has signed a $ 104,140 contract to test Bluetooth localization in US airports, which could one day transform airport security.

Founded in London, Pointr installs tiny Bluetooth tags around a place that can be used by smartphones for navigation in places where GPS is unreliable.

In London, Pointr has already been installed at King's Cross Station, Harrods Airport and Gatwick Airport, where an application can be downloaded that tells you how to get to the platform, the gate or the product you are looking for.

In Gatwick, Pointr's ultimate goal is to create an augmented reality orientation that, viewed with a smartphone, would place arrows on the ground to guide you.

In collaboration with Homeland Security and in partnership with engineering firm Arup, this is the first time that Pointr technology has been deployed in the United States.

"We are working on this program to help you when you arrive at a US airport, to help travelers get around better, to queue them more efficiently, to reduce wait times and things like that." , Axel Katalan, co-founder and chief marketing officer of the company, said Forbes.

picture without caption

Axel Katalan, co-founder and marketing director of Pointr.R point.

Agony at the airport

With more than 120 million passengers arriving each year in the United States via hundreds of size airports and dozens of different identification documents and visas, placing the right people in the right lanes of the airport is a must. waiting is a big challenge.

Homeland Security had originally launched the call last year for "innovative solutions that would ultimately lead to airport-specific real-time guidance systems, capable of providing travelers with the processes and services they need. they need to reach as quickly as possible. "

Katalan said that if the pilot project of a US airport, which was not yet known, succeeded, Pointr will approach the project with "the intention to achieve it or for each airport in the United States".

Arriving at an American airport is not just an experience that could be improved by this technology; there could be security benefits, too.

The security angle

Although the customer data collected by Pointr is anonymized (Homeland Security has stated that they should remain so for the test), there are still security benefits for Bluetooth tracking at airports, beyond the resolution of the chaos of queues.

picture without caption

Pointr said its more advanced wifi tracking tag would not be used for the homeland security trial.R point.

"You can understand the behavior of the customers, the downtimes or determine how people generally move and if this person moves suspiciously," said Katalan, recalling that this pilot project remained "focused on 39, improving the customer experience "rather than Security.

In addition to simple Bluetooth broadcast beacons for navigation, Pointr has also developed its own Pointr of Presence (POP) tag, which is networked and adds to Wi-Fi tracking, technologies that enable real-time device tracking. located near a location. .

Pointr said Forbes POP will not be used for this test Homeland Security Airport.

Katalan added that privacy is at the heart of Pointr's activities, stating: "All data is stored anonymously and will not be shared with any public party, and users will still have full control over choosing to register. and to withdraw via the application ".