Missing components for successful mergers and acquisitions



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Mergers and acquisitions are on the rise in North America, including autism services and behavioral health care. However, despite expectations and the capital that underlies them, mergers and acquisitions often fail. Perhaps we should spend more time thinking about how culture can help investors and managers navigate integration. & Nbsp;

Research Professor, bestselling author and speaker Bren & oacute; Brown assimilates courage and strength in the face of vulnerability. It's a message that has a personal resonance for me. When I became CEO, I spent a lot of time worrying about being vulnerable or someone who did not have all the answers. Many leaders fall into this trap; so many people rely on you, it creates incredible pressure to be perceived as controlled and impenetrable. It was once that I was vulnerable that my leadership became truly authentic.

We have been conditioned to hide our vulnerability to succeed in our professional career. However, authentic leadership requires vulnerability; you have to open up to criticism and be honest about uncertainty. It means being brave and taking risks, but also knowing that failure will happen and when that happens, you learn from your mistakes and persevere. These are qualities that naturally make us feel a loss of control, but this vulnerability of leadership fosters a true corporate culture.

When leaders are open about their experiences and the challenges they face, they build real connections with colleagues and staff. It also encourages every member of the organization to be more direct and honest. This promotes an environment and a culture where people are more appreciative, where creativity and ideas are shared more freely. This cohesion will absolutely improve performance and results.

Culture is inextricably linked to strategy. If you do not have an intentional culture that aligns your employees, this can hinder the execution of the strategy – as the saying goes, culture eats strategy for lunch. Still, I found that many investors did not sufficiently take into account the culture of the company when carrying out mergers and acquisitions. In fact, Queen's University's Center for Industrial Relations has concluded through its research, mergers and acquisitions often fail because "managers neglect human resource issues". When asked about the failures of mergers and acquisitions to achieve the desired results, misalignment of culture among merged organizations is often cited as an important factor.

Culture is critically important to the success of any merger or acquisition, especially in the area of ​​autism services. A large number of service providers in the autism sector have been founded and built by highly motivated clinicians who want to make a difference. If this company is acquired or merged without a clear vision, mission and structure to maintain the culture of society, there is a risk of losing the best clinicians for the benefit of competition. In addition, consumers of these services, families, are often very attached to the brand and culture of their service provider, the loss of customers and the degradation of the reputation are also the result of the lack of attention brought to culture.

A strong and intentional culture, guided by authentic leadership, is essential to successfully manage a merger or acquisition in this space. This should be one of the main concerns of investors and executives engaging in such an endeavor. Moreover, any integration between companies requires taking into account existing crops and determining whether these crops are congruent or not. Attempt to integrate misaligned cultures inevitably creates friction and has a negative impact on the performance of the company.

Deloitte, leader in auditing, consulting and consulting highlighted the importance of culture in mergers and acquisitions. They recommend making culture a major part of managing change in the business by assigning it to specific individuals and insisting that cultural work be focused on specific and well-defined issues. . In other words, empty platitudes can not replace an authentic culture with authentic leadership.

"The steering committee should reject soft, vague and ill-defined culture presentations. Instead, crop owners should be required to discuss specific, well-defined problems and supported by specific examples that may be related to the company's results. This is the difference between the culture addressed by general exhortations to promulgating "teamwork" and being taken into account by analyzes and interventions aimed at increasing the quantifiable collaboration between members of, for example, the merged sales force. of the new society. "& nbsp; – Deloitte," Cultural Issues in Mergers and Acquisitions"

As the field of autism services continues to grow, investor capital will continue to consolidate the market through mergers and acquisitions. If these large platforms want to maintain the clinical talent needed to flourish and reduce the inevitable obstacles associated with such structural changes, more emphasis should be placed on culture. Leaders need to remember that a genuine culture can only be maintained through genuine and vulnerable leadership, and that investors would benefit from placing greater emphasis on building authentic leadership and a positive culture before to trigger their market consolidation plans.

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Mergers and acquisitions are on the rise in North America, including autism services and behavioral health care. However, despite expectations and the capital that underlies them, mergers and acquisitions often fail. Perhaps we should spend more time thinking about how culture can help investors and managers navigate integration.

Research Professor, bestselling author and speaker Brené Brown assimilates courage and strength in the face of vulnerability. It's a message that has a personal resonance for me. When I became CEO, I spent a lot of time worrying about being vulnerable or someone who did not have all the answers. Many leaders fall into this trap; so many people rely on you, it creates incredible pressure to be perceived as controlled and impenetrable. It was once that I was vulnerable that my leadership became truly authentic.

We have been conditioned to hide our vulnerability to succeed in our professional career. However, authentic leadership requires vulnerability; you have to open up to criticism and be honest about uncertainty. It means being brave and taking risks, but also knowing that failure will happen and when that happens, you learn from your mistakes and persevere. These are qualities that naturally make us feel a loss of control, but this vulnerability of leadership fosters a true corporate culture.

When leaders are open about their experiences and the challenges they face, they build real connections with colleagues and staff. It also encourages every member of the organization to be more direct and honest. This promotes an environment and a culture where people are more appreciative, where creativity and ideas are shared more freely. This cohesion will absolutely improve performance and results.

Culture is inextricably linked to strategy. If you do not have an intentional culture that aligns your employees, this can hinder the execution of the strategy – as the saying goes, culture eats strategy for lunch. Still, I found that many investors did not sufficiently take into account the culture of the company when carrying out mergers and acquisitions. In fact, Queen's University's Center for Industrial Relations has concluded through its research, mergers and acquisitions often fail because "managers neglect human resource issues". When asked about the failures of mergers and acquisitions to achieve the desired results, misalignment of culture among merged organizations is often cited as an important factor.

Culture is critically important to the success of any merger or acquisition, especially in the area of ​​autism services. A large number of service providers in the autism sector have been founded and built by highly motivated clinicians who want to make a difference. If this company is acquired or merged without a clear vision, mission and structure to maintain the culture of society, there is a risk of losing the best clinicians for the benefit of competition. In addition, consumers of these services, families, are often very attached to the brand and culture of their service provider, the loss of customers and the degradation of the reputation are also the result of the lack of attention brought to culture.

A strong and intentional culture, guided by authentic leadership, is essential to successfully manage a merger or acquisition in this space. This should be one of the main concerns of investors and executives engaging in such an endeavor. Moreover, any integration between companies requires taking into account existing crops and determining whether these crops are congruent or not. Attempt to integrate misaligned cultures inevitably creates friction and has a negative impact on the performance of the company.

Deloitte, leader in auditing, consulting and consulting highlighted the importance of culture in mergers and acquisitions. They recommend making culture a major part of managing change in the business by assigning it to specific individuals and insisting that cultural work be focused on specific and well-defined issues. . In other words, empty platitudes can not replace an authentic culture with authentic leadership.

"The steering committee should reject soft, vague and ill-defined culture presentations. Instead, crop owners should be required to discuss specific, well-defined problems and supported by specific examples that may be related to the company's results. This is the difference between the culture addressed by general exhortations to "teamwork" and by analyzes and interventions to increase measurable collaboration among members of the newly merged sales force, for example. "- Deloitte, in mergers and acquisitions"

As the field of autism services continues to grow, investor capital will continue to consolidate the market through mergers and acquisitions. If these large platforms want to maintain the clinical talent needed to flourish and reduce the inevitable obstacles associated with such structural changes, more emphasis should be placed on culture. Leaders need to remember that a genuine culture can only be maintained through genuine and vulnerable leadership, and that investors would benefit from placing greater emphasis on building authentic leadership and a positive culture before to trigger their market consolidation plans.