How to make your bike lanes known before they are completed


Cycling tourists. Picture of Baker County Tourism

Do you have an "upcoming" bike path? Or a bike path that is not yet completely finished? Well, do not keep it secret!

Some places I visited recently, I heard about trails being finished. Some sections of the trail have been improved, others are still difficult.

"Once the trail is finished," say the people, "we will promote it".

"When it's done, we'll see many more visitors."

But why are you waiting? If people can ride a bicycle or even ride a bike legally in a part of the city, then it's quite ready to tell the world. Even if there are parts that are not improved.

Not all cyclists are looking for easy and perfectly fluid outings. There are many riders who are thrilled by a difficult race. You could now attract all kinds of runners, associating them with the types of rides that they can expect to find.

People who are now starting to enjoy your trail will have the impression of discovering something new, a hidden gem. They will have a sense of investment as they come back year after year and see improvements. They will talk to you about other runners, gaining status to be aware.

Start talking about your track that is not quite finished as an "emerging" track. The one who is partly ready now and constantly improving.

Put it on trail lists and online maps as "partially improved". (Just search for your state's name and your "bike lanes" or ask bikers where to indicate it.) Clearly mark which parts are improved and which are not. Be scrupulously honest about the current conditions so that people know which segments are right for them.

Bonus Points: Include a link in your new list for the donation page where people can help fund improvements.

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About Becky McCray

Becky launched Small Biz Survival in 2006 to share stories and ideas of building businesses and rural communities with other small businessmen. She and her husband own an Alva, Oklahoma liquor store and a small ranch nearby. Becky is an international speaker on small business.

  • Stop using "3 foot stool" to describe an idea – June 24, 2019
  • What are your challenges? Add your voice here – 17 June 2019
  • How to make your bike lanes known before they are completed – June 10, 2019
  • How $ 5 and a bowl of soup can rebuild your community – 3 June 2019
  • Bring people to mix at an event – May 27, 2019
  • Crowdsourced Ideas for Cafes and Other Third Places – May 20, 2019
  • Post signs with your tourist hashtag where visitors will see them. – May 13, 2019
  • Book Review: Celebrity CEO of Ramon Ray – May 6, 2019
  • How to develop an entrepreneurial culture and more small businesses in your city 29th April 2019
  • Where is the future mural of your city? – 22 April 2019

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