Greta Thunberg unimpressed as world leaders gather at Madrid climate talks



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Politicians from around the world gathered in Madrid today to discuss some of the most controversial issues in the global fight against climate change, while activists and experts have criticized what is happening in the world. They view it as a slow and ineffective response from the international community.

Today, in its second week, COP25 of the United Nations Climate Change Conference has entered its high-level phase, during which ministers from participating countries meet to discuss issues such as carbon trading.

Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, for her part, is not impressed: "If you look at it from a certain point of view, we have got nothing", did she told reporters in the Spanish capital.

It's a point of view that finds the sympathy of the experts at the conference. "We are leading our daily lives without really recognizing that we are very close to a tipping point, both environmental and political," said Cynthia Elliott, climate program partner at World Resources Institute, a non-profit organization. Washington, DC. profit that promotes environmental sustainability and economic opportunities.

"At the moment, there are record floods and fires all over the world, and these things will only get worse. So while Article 6 rules are crucial to doing things right, they alone will not be enough to take the bold steps we need to tackle climate change.

Article 6 refers to the section of the Paris Agreement that details how nations can reduce their emissions by using international carbon markets. "Article 6 is the most urgent issue because it is the most controversial," Elliott told Forbes.com of Madrid. "At the heart of this lies the integrity of the Paris Agreement: if you get weak rules, you compromise the honesty and integrity of the process; you get systems that allow countries to meet their commitments without doing anything at all. "

Among the main issues covered by Article 6, there is what is known as "double counting", a situation in which two or more countries end up claiming credits for the same reasons. emission reductions, as well as issues related to the share of revenues from carbon trading.

But Elliott also suggested that the requirement to focus on the details of the deal contributes to something approaching inertia. This accredits the complaints of prominent figures like Thunberg, as well as experts such as Johan Rockström, deputy director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, who told the media this weekend at COP25: "We risk getting bogged down as much in the technical details of these negotiations as we forget to see the forest for the trees. "

"We take care of our daily lives without really recognizing that we are very close to a tipping point, both environmental and political," said Elliott. "At the moment, there are record floods and fires all over the world, and these things will only get worse. Still, people are focusing on Article 6 and are looking for the least expensive option to tackle climate change. "

From this point of view, the COP has not responded to the urgency of the problem. "There are certainly some substantial efforts being made, but it is not enough and it is not fast enough," said Elliott. "The missing piece is how do you get people to think about the climate in every decision – whether it's a national government or a company?"

She suggested further emphasis on long-term climate strategies, such as those adopted by New Zealand and the United Kingdom, which have passed laws to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050. Under this legislation, all major projects, public and private, must explicitly consider their costs or benefits in terms of emissions.

Nevertheless, the combined governments should not compromise to obtain a solid set of rules for the rapid development of Article 6 before the end of the week, when the conference is expected to conclude.

"We would prefer the conversation to continue next year, rather than settling on political accommodations that are not technically sound," Elliott said. "They can not keep pushing this back forever, but there is not much benefit for anyone who makes too much compromise just to get a result."

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Politicians from around the world gathered in Madrid today to discuss some of the most controversial issues in the global fight against climate change, while activists and experts have criticized what is happening in the world. They view it as a slow and ineffective response from the international community.

Today, in its second week, COP25 of the United Nations Climate Change Conference has entered its high-level phase, during which ministers from participating countries meet to discuss issues such as carbon trading.

Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, on the other hand, is not impressed: "If you look at it from a certain point of view, we have not got anything," she told reporters. journalists in the Spanish capital.

It's a point of view that finds the sympathy of the experts at the conference. "We are leading our daily lives without really recognizing that we are very close to a tipping point, both environmental and political," said Cynthia Elliott, climate program partner at World Resources Institute, a non-profit organization. Washington, DC. profit that promotes environmental sustainability and economic opportunities.

"At the moment, there are record floods and fires all over the world, and these things will only get worse. So while Article 6 rules are crucial to doing things right, they alone will not be enough to take the bold steps we need to tackle climate change.

Article 6 refers to the section of the Paris Agreement that details how nations can reduce their emissions by using international carbon markets. "Article 6 is the most urgent issue because it is the most controversial," Elliott told Forbes.com of Madrid. "At the heart of this lies the integrity of the Paris Agreement: if you get weak rules, you compromise the honesty and integrity of the process; you get systems that allow countries to meet their commitments without doing anything at all. "

Among the main issues covered by Article 6, there is what is known as "double counting", a situation in which two or more countries end up claiming credits for the same reasons. emission reductions, as well as issues related to the share of revenues from carbon trading.

But Elliott also suggested that the requirement to focus on the details of the deal contributes to something approaching inertia. This accredits the complaints of prominent figures like Thunberg, as well as experts such as Johan Rockström, deputy director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, who told the media this weekend at COP25: "We risk getting bogged down as much in the technical details of these negotiations as we forget to see the forest for the trees. "

"We take care of our daily lives without really recognizing that we are very close to a tipping point, both environmental and political," said Elliott. "At the moment, there are record floods and fires all over the world, and these things will only get worse. Still, people are focusing on Article 6 and are looking for the least expensive option to tackle climate change. "

From this point of view, the COP has not responded to the urgency of the problem. "There are certainly some substantial efforts being made, but it is not enough and it is not fast enough," said Elliott. "The missing piece is how do you get people to think about the climate in every decision – whether it's a national government or a company?"

She suggested further emphasis on long-term climate strategies, such as those adopted by New Zealand and the United Kingdom, which have passed laws to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050. Under this legislation, all major projects, public and private, must explicitly consider their costs or benefits in terms of emissions.

Nevertheless, the united governments should not compromise to obtain a solid set of rules for the rapid drafting of Article 6 by the end of the week, when the conference is expected to conclude.

"We would prefer the conversation to continue next year, rather than settling on political accommodations that are not technically sound," Elliott said. "They can not keep pushing this back forever, but there is not much benefit for anyone who makes too much compromise just to get a result."

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